Poutine On The Ritz

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I love Canadians.  They’re like Americans except quieter, less aggressive, more polite, and slimmer. But one thing for which they are not known is their food.  Let’s face it, once you travel beyond maple syrup and bacon (sometimes together!) there’s a vast wilderness of Canadian cuisine.

In my area of Upstate New York we have dozens of quality, upscale restaurants featuring Italian, French, Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Jamaican, Mexican, Polish, Indian, African, Irish, English (not recommended) and, of course, American food.  But I’ve never seen a dining establishment specializing in ‘Canadian food.’ Really – what IS Canadian food besides brown or white bread and catsup?

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Meet Poutine.*  Poutine is generally considered Canada’s unique “national dish.”  It originated in Quebec. Poutine often tastes better than it looks which is good because it looks like it’s been eaten before. It’s best washed down by the country’s national drink: beer.

Poutine is made with french fries and cheese curds topped with a light brown gravy. The taste variations on those three ingredients is mathematically equal to the number of hockey pucks found in the country.  It’s said on a quiet winter night in Canada (when the giant mosquitoes aren’t buzzing) you can actually hear your blood vessels groan shut after eating a large plate of poutine.

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Poutine Pizza

Poutine:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poutine

*Rochester now has a food truck named ‘Le Petit Poutine.’  You can read about it here:  http://www.yelp.com/biz/le-petit-poutine-rochester

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