Archive for January 15th, 2008

Why Can’t We All Just “Search for Tomorrow”?

Tuesday, January 15th, 2008

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There were only two bad things about starting kindergarten when I was five. The first was the requirement of ‘Knows How to Tie Shoes.’ I didn’t – and couldn’t seem to learn. I got a big U (unsatisfactory) for it. Since I got ‘S’s in everything else, it didn’t seem to be a big deal with my parents – although they were usually pretty strict about school. Diversity wasn’t exactly an ideal in my family – but if small eccentricities didn’t embarrass them too much, Mom and Dad let them slip by. However, after the second or third ‘Tie Shoes-U’ report card, they bought me loafers – without talking about it, and that was the end of that.

But the second thing about starting kindergarten was far worse: not being able to sit on the ‘sofa’ with my Mom for 15 minutes every weekday around noon to watch “Search for Tomorrow”. I felt bad about that. I’m sure she did too, but again, it was no big deal. It was like, “That’s the way it goes, Kid. If you can’t be happy with what you have, at least be thankful you don’t get what you deserve.” And although that sounds a little harsh today, I can just imagine Mom and Dad saying it with a little teasing laughter – bobbing on an ocean of love. They were the best.

“Search for Tomorrow” was the longest running soap opera on American television. It started airing on Monday, September 3, 1951 and continued until the final episode on Friday, December 26, 1986. That’s over 35-years – 9,130 episodes. And what were
the final lines – on the final show – on that day after Christmas, 1986? “Joanne Tate” the show’s star for its entire run, is asked, “What are you searching for, Joanne?” Her reply? “Tomorrow.” (MUSIC UP- FADE TO BLACK ).

It hardly seemed worth the wait. But nothing is only what it seems. I’ll never think about that dumb show without thinking of sitting on our ‘sofa’ with my Mom over a half-century ago.

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Debra. 1980

Tuesday, January 15th, 2008

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